March 4th 2019

On March 4th, 1979, NASA’s Voyager 1 spacecraft took the first photos of rings around Jupiter. This was the first time anyone had seen Jupiter’s rings.

Because Jupiter’s rings are so thin and faint, it’s extremely difficult to see them from Earth with ground-based telescopes. Even for a spacecraft out near Jupiter, the rings are essentially invisible unless the cameras look at them edge-on or from an angle where sunlight shines directly through them.

Since Voyager 1 first saw the rings, other space missions like Juno and Galileo have continued to study them. Scientists believe that the rings formed by comets colliding with Jupiter’s moons and kicking dust into the planet’s orbit.

Source: https://www.space.com/39251-on-this-day-in-space.html

Sat 17 Nov – Buying a telescope

Thinking of asking for or giving a telescope for Christmas?  Cork Astronomy Club has a word of advice to offer: don’t!  Or at least, not until you have attended our “What telescope” workshop on Saturday November 17th.

What type of telescope? Dobsonian, Newtonian, go-to? Or would binoculars be better for you? How much to spend?  Is there such a thing as a beginner’s scope?  Where do I buy it? … So many questions … and one place to get the answers …  Tony Jackson’s “What telescope” workshop on November 17th, at Tory Top Library, 2:30 pm.  Our Club has no connection whatever to any business and you will receive impartial advice from an expert amateur astronomer.  Not a Club member?  You can still come, and it’s free, but need to book, please email info@corkastronomyclub.com.

Light Pollution news

In common with many cities around the world, Cork has a light pollution campaign pressing for more efficient and less wasteful lighting to mitigate the pollution of our skies by excessive light.  As an astronomy club, it’s easy to see why this is an issue for us – but light pollution goes far beyond nice-to-have dark skies. Light pollution also affects the health of humans and wildlife, wastes energy, and where that energy is produced by fossil fuels, contributes to climate disruption.

The Cork Sky Friendly Campaign was inaugurated in the spring of 2017, and Cork Astronomy Club is proud to have played a leading role in setting it up.  The campaign is also supported by Cork Environmental Forum, Cork Nature Network, Cork Green Party, and the Bere Islands Projects.  We encourage our members and others to get involved and support the campaign.  To find out how to do this, please email corkskyfriendly@gmail.com or ring 087-1321368  (Doroteja)