21st January 2019

A total lunar eclipse will take place on 21 January 2019 UTC (Coordinated Universal Time). For observers in the Americas, the eclipse will take place between the evening of Sunday, January 20 and the early morning hours of Monday, January 21. For observers in Europe and Africa, the eclipse will occur during the morning of January 21. The eclipse will occur during a supermoon. It will also be the last total lunar eclipse until May 2021.

The eclipse will be visible in its entirety from North and South America, as well as portions of western Europe and northwest Africa. From locations in North America, the eclipse will begin during the evening hours of January 20. Observers at locations in Europe and much of Africa will be able to view part of the eclipse before the Moon sets in the early morning (pre-dawn) hours of January 21.

Contact points relative to Earth’s umbral and penumbral shadows, here with the Moon near its descending node

The timing of total lunar eclipses are determined by its contacts:

P1 (First contact): Beginning of the penumbral eclipse. Earth’s penumbra touches the Moon’s outer limb.
U1 (Second contact): Beginning of the partial eclipse. Earth’s umbra touches the Moon’s outer limb.
U2 (Third contact): Beginning of the total eclipse. The Moon’s surface is entirely within Earth’s umbra.
Greatest eclipse: The peak stage of the total eclipse. The Moon is at its closest to the center of Earth’s umbra.
U3 (Fourth contact): End of the total eclipse. The Moon’s outer limb exits Earth’s umbra.
U4 (Fifth contact): End of the partial eclipse. Earth’s umbra leaves the Moon’s surface.
P4 (Sixth contact): End of the penumbral eclipse. Earth’s penumbra no longer makes contact with the Moon.

The penumbral phases of the eclipse changes the appearance of the Moon only slightly and is generally not noticeable.

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/January_2019_lunar_eclipse